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joining forces, we are so proud of the work you've done to help rally america around military families and veterans. i'm inspired by what they're doing, so thank you, michelle, for your extraordinary work. join at was proud to your convention three years ago. [applause] it is wonderful to be back. i want to thank your national much.der, thank you so teame entire leadership johnson, burgess, don adams, all the incredible spouses and spouses that the dav auxiliary. i want to thank barry janowski. i got it. [laughter] they used to mispronounce obama, too. [laughter] i want to thank barry and your grade team in washington. disabled american veterans, like all veterans, you carry in your hearts the story of brave service that took you to every as young men earth , leftmen, you left home everyone you ever knew because clouds gathered far across the sea. you had your whole life ahead of you, but you were willing to risk all of it for this land that we love. because you know from hard experience what we must never our country and doors because in every generation there are americans like you w
america and against our interests. the president is committed to strengthening these programs. he has put forth ideas to strengthen these organs. he is following through on promises of reforms. i terms of specific reports, am not in a position to comment on it because i have not read it. >> is the white house aware of out?toruy coming were you guys aware, and i'm curious if you have concerns about this kind of information being out, or are you comfortable -- >> it is hard for me to a comment on the information in the report. i did not talk to the journalist or can on the story, so i'm not a position to comment on that information. we have talked about our concerns about the damaging leak of classified information, but i am not sure whether or not that applies here because i have not read the story. times talked a couple about the global community being in agreement now on chemical weapons in syria. consensus will strengthen over the next few days, or is it already at a point where the president feels he has international mandate? new -- we consider will continue our consultations with i l
standards in journalism. >> a new voice of journalism in the u.s., al jazeera america. america. >> we tell the human store ri from around the block, across the country. >> if joe can't find work, his family will go from living in a hotel to living in their car. >> connected, inspired, bold. >> bob filner has resigned at mayor of san diego. he spent his last two months fighting a growing list have sexual harassment allegations. the san diego city council accepted his resignation this afternoon. he will officially step down august 30. he said goodbye to san diego, and apologized for letting the city down. >> obviously this is not a happy time for any of us, not for the city of san diego, not for those who represent and for my own part in causing all this, i offer deep apology certainly to all the citizens of san diego and through you to the citizens that you represent. the city should not have been put through this, and my own personal failures were responsible, and i apologize to the city. >> stephanie stanton joins us live from san diego. he apologized, but he didn't admit bob filner did r
from america and its allies is on the cards. we just don't know when it might come. but as syria's ambassador to the u.n. said the country right now is in a state of war and preparing for the worse. >> that's john terrett reporting. bam as der. when you look at that bam and when you, might that be the reason why there has been hesitancy to get involved with syria. >> i don't think so at all. i think that if the united states wished to apply direct military force to take out the syrian air force, for example, it could do so. we face terrorist threats were hezbollah and iran already, and yes, it can get worse, but at the same time i think we're facing those things already. the issue for the. >> obama: administration ifor ff the conflict. >> can you talk about the question of why chemical weapons have become the red line? thousands of people were killed in syria by the government already, we didn't take action. >> right. >> suddenly because chemical weapons are used we're taking action. what sense does that make? >> yes, it's an interesting point of view. my point of view is really
to the role that america has played in that region for a long time. now, it's important that people know that, to get your point, because it's important for people understand what we're doing, why we're doing it, to understand first of all that our alliances are strong and we stand behind our alliances. second, that we are not picking a fight with anyone. we are not trying to militarize a situation there. we would like what has been happening in decades past to keep going. democracy has been spreading across -- prosperity has been spreading to a huge economic and political development and a part of world without any conflict at all. so that's the fight that we have on the pivot and that's why we're doing it and that's why we're saying what we're doing. nobody it's the wrong idea by the duty provided the of why we're doing it spent we only had a couple of minutes left and mechanical of our time because the to the invoke year is they put us on planes and send us back. we will take two questions. kimberly and no here. we'll take a cu key and then you can pick which one you're answering. >> you m
america - a new voice in american journalism - >>introduces america tonight. >>in egypt, police fired teargas at supporters of the ... >>a fresh take on the stories that connect to you. [[voiceover]] they risk never returning to the united states. >>grounded. >>real. >>unconventional. [[voiceover]] we spent time with some members of the gangster disciples. >>an escape from the expected. >>i'm a cancer survivor. not only cancer, but brain cancer. that's the headlines "consider this" is up next on al jazeera. ♪ ♪ >>> measles outbreak in texas has been linked to a so-called mega church where ministers have questioned the use of vaccinations. at least 21 people from the illness. health officials and the church itself are trying to contain the outbreak by hosting vaccination clinics. doctors say a visitor to the church who was infected with measles likely spread it to the population at the community church. >>> it's a bit like having a snow day off, but across the midwest, it's heat not wintery weather that is closing schools. the sweltering temperatures have closed schools. those who
, and the schools, no account teachers, and let's bring in teach for america clubs, open up charter schools in the district, and that's the model, the idea that's been propagated for the last decade plus under republican administration and a democratic administration. it is just the latest in a series of silver bullets overredded up, and you can just change the structure and everything else changes, but i think what union city teaches is -- or reminds us that -- is that there are a handful of time-tested, well-proven, well-established game changing strategies the school district can be done, and i'll say a word about that in a minute. why write about it? people forgot or took it for granted. it is almost like platitude, and any incompetenter with -- educator with a pulse will nod their head and say, sure. the trick is actually going from saying, yeah, that's a great idea to making it happen. in union city, you start with amazing preschool systems, and i know you are here someplace or another. where are you, suzie? [applause] i spent a fair amount of time in your class, and i walked in there
veterans of america, represents nearly 200,000 people, many of whom are young vets. msnbc contributor bill briggs joins me now with his report on this. bill, we've talked so much about the suicide rate and the problems, though, that these vets cite, sadly, are things that you would think could be addressed by our government, including getting their benefits when they retire and some other things that can be taken care of for them. >> yeah, the backlog on benefit -- receiving their benefits is enormous. that's contributing to this problem and has been for several years. it's such a complex issue, and it involves so many realities of coming home from war, reintegrating with your family, reintegrating with your community, finding a job, substance abuse. it's a very complex issue that i think some experts are finally starting to get a handle on maybe what's triggering this spike. >> and what do they believe is the key component? and i feel terrible trying to minimize this to one thing because as you pointed out, it's a laundry list of things these men and women face. >> yeah, what's really int
told this reporter the great thing about america is there's all these jobs. that's not something americans think, like there's all these jobs. the other thing on these immigrants said was, the other great thing about america is that if you work hard you can get ahead in this country. >> i was here in texas a month or two ago, and it was a small business, just one little taxi come and the driver was an immigrant. i asked him about his experience when he came to america. he said when i arrived it was like i was woken up and i had these opportunities. >> i think it's kind of ambitious drive that is unique to immigrants. let's face it, there's -- 99% of the people in the world never move from where the girl. watauga but the 1% of people are ambitious enough and courageous enough to leave your homeland is a very courageous thing to do. so this is as an economist, i just think this is one of the kind of innate advantages of having immigration. number one, they are preselected for kind of economic success. and number two, this gets back to my point about china, let's face it, the bigges
, america became more free and more fair. america changed for you and for me. [ bells tolling ] >> reporter: moments before the president spoke, bells rang out across the u.s. to commemorate the moment in 1963 when dr. king uttered his famous phrase. >> as the bells toll today, let us reflect on the bravery, let us reflect on the sacrifice of those who stood up for freedom. >> reporter: among the thousands in washington was edith lee payne who was there 50 years ago as well. the detroit woman who was as a child seen in this iconic 1963 photo reflected on both events. >> why was it important to be here? >> because my mother brought me. and if we're going to continue to make change and make this world better, we have to be a part of that change. >> reporter: the thousands that showed up battled rain, humidity and long security lines, but they stayed to honor the freedom marchers of 50 years ago. john and diana? >> tahman, thank you. >> tough to navigate. president obama opening his mouth and getting some people annoyed. other people saying great. he really had to please a lot of people with t
're on day 25 of filner watch. >>> and honoring america's heroes. first responders front and center. >> there is no second chance in if you're late, it will matter. >> country music superstar tim mcgraw and a new program to empower our firefighters and emts. >> share these stories with you. >> mcgraw joins me live, straight ahead. you're live in the cnn "newsroom." >>> good morning to you. thank you so much for being with me. i'm carol costello. no flight data recorders, no communications and no answers. the big question remains this morning, why did a u.p.s. cargo jet crash just before landing in alabama? right now more than 24 hours after the crash, the cockpit and voice recorders have yet to be recovered. both remain inside the still smoldering wreckage. now, the answers may be in those recorde recorders, since there was no communication from the pilots to air traffic control just before the crash and the only clues available are from witnesses. >> when i got up, it just, i just heard like a boom, boom. and i didn't know what it was. i was just staring out the window and i looked
of america and our allies. it matters because a lot of other countries whose policies challenge these international norms are watching. fate are watching. they want to see whether the united states and our friends mean what we saw a. it is directly related to our credibility and whether country still believe the united states when it says something. they are watching to see if syria can get away with it because then maybe they too can put the world at greater risk. make no mistake. in an increasingly complicated world of sectarian and religious extremist violence, what we choose to do or not do matters in real ways to our own security. some cite the risk of doing things but we need to ask what is the risk of doing nothing? it matters because if we choose to live in a world where a thug and a murderer like the shark assad can gas thousands of his people with impunity even after the united states and our allies said no and then the world does nothing about it there will be no end to the test of hours of the dangers that will flow from those others who believe that they can do as t
on here at home this is a time to get off all foreign oil, especially foreign oil outside of north america. no reason to get off mexican and canadian oil. they're our friends. >> i feel like we've been saying this how many years now. >> beginning of time. >> fought with iraq, get off oil. gas hits $3, get off oil. we're not. nothing is happening. the problem, of course, is no one is making any more money than they were when gas was back at $3. so this is absolutely going to crunch the economy. especially your lower and middle-class people that don't have that much discretionary income to begin wit and now taking more of it. i fill my car up twice a week commuting and taking my kids point a to point b. this will hurt me. >> $4 oil is a killer. that's 40 to $50 dlb out of the economy. cost of goods sold goes up, cost of everything goes up and nothing good happens at that point in time. >> gary, i mean -- >> except for the fact that -- >> go ahead. >> increases new opportunities for people making alternative forms of fuel that are cost prohibitive for investment right now but when you have oi
to this year's printer's row literary festival to hear about "the cooked seed." then on to bookexpo be america in new york city city with erica jong who talks about "fear of flying." and we finish with author and radio talk show host larry elder at the los angeles times festival of books as he discusses his memoir about his troubled relationship with his father in "dear father, dear son." booktv in prime time all this week on c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> host: well, with the announcement this week that "the washington post" has been sold to jeff bethos, we thought we'd take this opportunity to look at changes in the newspaper industry and the potential future of the news industry in general. we have two guests joining us this week. first, we want to introduce you to alan mutter. he is in san francisco, and he is a newspaper consultant, he's a lecturer as well at the university of california berkeley on media economics, and he has served as a newspaper editor, a cable tv executive and a tech
between black and white perceptions. he is the measure of the alienation of black america from white america so he knows if he is outrageous and people attack him there will be a tendency to support him because he is now being beleaguered by the very people who are being viewed as the people who are oppressing. he would make these outrageous comments and he would be attacked by everyone and he would come in town without a single bit of advertising and draw people to a rally because people were rallying around the attacked brother. it's much the same in the arab world. when saddam hussein was making bold and outrageous comments he was praying on the alienation and frustration and anger of people who feel that their histories out of control, that they are being beleaguered by the west, that they have no ability to shape their destiny. and so here's this guy standing up and defending him. james baker understood that. in 1991 he spoke before a congressional testimony and said why don't we do this and why do we do that? james baker said understand what saddam is doing is praying on arab a
or bad. yes, the long-term concern is there. if the papers go away america will be in very serious trouble because when you get down to it the television reporters are , what that one guy said, they are lap poodles. it is basically nothing more than lap pools for house members here in phoenix. you just do not know what is going on in washington from the electronic media at all. for the callou this morning. on that subject that you talked about on the future of newspapers and specifically what might happen with "the washington post," and this bezos -- by jeff might've contributed to part the sale. here's a bit of what he said. [video clip] was latemily was in -- in adopting a payroll product, which most of the major market has already started doing. the fact that they could've started that years ago, the way the financial times or the wall street journal had done years ago, i think maybe that certainly hastens their financial difficulties, that they were so late to doing a pay wall. politico is a block in bc. they have a high tier subscription product, which seems to be doing very w
shouted back no america, america. i had thrown my passport at them i was born in washington d.c.. they would kick me in the stomach when i would get my breath back and as others join the firing squad i would say america, america. at some point they take the guns from our heads we believe because we were from the same country. they would have to pay a price for killing us that they would never have to pay for killing them. a red cross jeep pulled up and the driver of the red cross jeep picked up this old man who was in a sewer ditch next to us. every time the soldiers beat him he would put up his hands and a prayer sign and they would smash the buts of their rifles into his face. we drove off to a hospital and they stopped us to get away from us and we drove as a human mouse to the hospital. they hung off the top of the ge. at the hospital the doctors and nurses started to cry when they saw us. not because we were in worship and the people. that we were being dragged there. i think because of what we have represented. not just allen and i but i think americans. not just timor b
of america merrill lynch. we will grow by 8.2% this year, beating china for the fifth straight year. the energy front, our oil production has increased by 50% since 2005. iraq a expects to increase oil production to 4.5 million barrels by the end of 2014 and 9 million barrels a day by 2020. as the international energy agency has reported, iraq is poised to double our export of oil by the decade of 2015. -- of 2050. we will use our strained global oil markets. in spite of this progress, we have challenges that we are working to address. 90% of our economy depends on oil. unemployment rate is 11%, our poverty line rate is 23%. although there has been significant progress over the last few years, and we think the development millennium goals set by the united nations. in order to diversify our economy beyond energy, iraq is investing oil revenues in education and crucial development projects, including restoration of power and rebuilding our transportation system. our economy will benefit from our progress on the germanic front as well. last month, the united nations security council r
need to do we need to acquit allies, it cannot look like america jumping in to another civil war in the middle east trying to get involved. this should be the world community coming together, not everybody in the world, we need to make it clear we have no interest in getting in the middle of this civil war, no interest in choosing sides and getting out. lori: can you pinpoint but chemical weapons? can you take out those chemical weapons with a missile strike or do you have to have boots and the ground? do you know the particulars of that? >> some say you have to have. on the ground. everything i read from credible people that i trust say that you can do this from a standoff, you can have ships in the mediterranean, tomahawk cruise missiles equipped in a certain way but if these syrian chemical weapons depots, we know the israelis have done this, they have bombed and taken out syrian chemical weapons sites, i don't know why we couldn't be able to do that but if we go and think we are going to topple assad or kill assad what is the next government that goes after assad? al qaeda. t
"america's got talent" the little dog bailey and dance partner. they will be here live this morning. >>> we do begin this half hour with a close call in california. police say a situation there was milliseconds from tragedy when a scene being shot for a movie got too real. >> reporter: as linda bergsly approached a coffee shop she saw something that made her hair stand on end -- armed, masked men threatening people inside. >> there was a gun. >> reporter: she quickly called 911. >> one pulled the gun out of the pocket. >> reporter: police rushed to the scene, prepared for a potential gun battle. >> by all intents and purposes it was an armed robbery and cops responded as such. >> reporter: an audio device captured what happened next. >> what are you doing? we're shooting a short film. >> after they stripped him the gun, he saw the film crew. >> reporter: the gunman and supposed hostages were actors, shooting an independent film. >> they didn't pull permits and didn't notify the police department. do. of an important thing to >> reporter: but according to the glenn dora city website, the fi
then will america do? what will iran do? what will russia do but i started off, mr. speaker, by making a reference for the first world war, next year we are going to be commemorating the stinking great of the events of august 1914. and those events have a worrying parallel because you have a series of actions and reactions which drew in an escalating fashion one country after another. nobody thought that the assassination of an obscure archduke woodley toward world event. this is a powder keg and we should not be lobbing weapons into the heart of such combustible material. >> we will break away from this british house of commons debate on syria at this point. were expected this debate to continue for several hours with possible votes later today. taking a look at democratic congressman saying there's no vital national security involved, even if it's in government has proved to deliver did use chemical weapons, which -- republican scott wigle tweets what's happening right now in british parliament should be happening in the u.s. congress. moral issue. is a death caused by chemical weapons wors were
for president obama in 2008 the first time with the sincere expectation his election would make america more popular around the globe. that hasn't happened. why? >> it hasn't happened. the president said he was going to remake america's image in the world. i think a lot of people thought because he did have a charismatic personality, certainly the president himself believes himself to be charismatic, he was going to be able to win more friends for america, that america would suddenly be beloved by all. what the president seems not to understand, what is most important in terms of a country's standing is that you are respected not necessarily liked. so the president's effort to make everyone like us i think has made us look weak. >> so it's had the opposite effect? >> that's exactly right. what's happened is, the united states is perceived as, first of all, tenuous about making decisions. we had what happened in egypt, for example, the administration was really i think very slow and has still been slow to understand the muslim brotherhood was not democratic. we had the president drawing lines
parties and a funeral, plus plenty of valet parking in america's gilded capitol. read the book and engage on our facebook page and twitter. "washington journal" continues. host: at the table now, michael steele, the former r.n.c. chairman from 200-2011, thank you for joining us. we've been talking about syria, do you see a division within the republican party on syria? guest: i don't think there's been a clear voice that's come out about what republicans say about this. certainly there is a union anymority about what we need to do next, which is definitely deal with the use of chemical weapons by the assad government. but i think a lot of republicans are waiting to see exactly where the president is going to go with the foreign policy. you have the secretary of state calling this a moral obscenity. so the tone and the rhetoric is there. the question is now what are the next steps? the president and his team have been very good, at least in this instance, of getting and keeping the congress informed, getting members of congress in on the conversation early enough, so that should some type
of the united states of america, and to me, everybody that's willing -- strike that. everybody that's able to make that contribution should be forced to do it. then when the congress says that it's mandatory that we send troops, and these troops may be in harm's way, members of congress will hear from their voters, and their voters would say whether or not in their opinion there should be a red line, or in their opinion, whether or not the united states should attack another country, whether you call it war, limited war, the fact remains we were looking for weapons of mass sdru destructions, we didn't find it. so we know what war is, and people that have been involved in war know that it's hell, and it shouldn't be based on drawing red lines. >> you're obviously being very critical of the president right now for drawing that red line. i want to get reaction from your colleague, republican congressman peter king of long island. he's the chairman of the house subcommittee on counterterrorism -- counterintelligence and terrorism. this is a statement. i'll read it to you, congressman. presiden
to working on that and have an immigration bill that will really work for iowa and for america. [applause] .. >> businesses get it and now how important it is for the vitality of america and endorsed by the afl-cio, so labor understands it also. we thank both labor and business community for supporting the immigration bill. [applause] so, nick, you've been involved in ufcw, packing house workers and stuff, and it's been my experience as i toured them, and i didn't work in them like durbin did. he was a meat cutter in packing houses, but as i've traveled around, i see more and more of the latino community working in our packing houses and meat cutting places you represent. tell us about that. >> i'm with local cw222 from northwest iowa. we have a packing house in cherokee, iowa, and dakota city, nebraska. too-- together, that's roughly close to 5,000 employee, and 75% of them are latino. >> 75%? >> yes, yes, so 75% of the membership who we represent are latino and immigrant workers, so, again, good morning, ladies and gentlemen, of the panel and audience, senators, i'm honored to be here t
. and people all over america are experiencing in the mail every day sticker shock over their premiums and now, the internet is more organized and sophisticated to get out that anger in large numbers, don't you think? >> there is certainly anger and you will so insurance companies, u.s. chamber of commerce, get out there and sell a message that the sales tax on health care insurance will hurt consume sxers then the president and his organization trying to push people to enroll in to this to make the argument to help folks. but remember, there is not a bill hang negligent balance here and as much as the house tried to repeal all or part was health care reform. >> it is delay and so forth. but let me move on to immigration and what people refer to as amnesty. one group in particular that is fighting against amnesty and they have organized 58,000 people to either get out on the streets in protest or contact their congressman at their home offices. they know where they live in the home districts. what did that immigration? >> on immigration, you will have both sides gearing up here. folks that are
and how we can bring our a game to the table every day to serve america's communities that have many times too little access to health care. so i wanted to welcome you all to the room and welcome senator ben cardin to the room who is no stranger to baltimore medical since and has been around i got here, and that is like 300 years ago. senator was at the very beginning of a great assist to baltimore medical system when we had our help waiver. we had a medicare demonstration project for many years, and every time it looked like it was going to end or expire come -- the senator could be counted on to not only sure it will be realistic but to renew the effort to make sure that happened. when we wanted to build a brand- new building, he was the first one i came to see. which started the conversation when he was on one side of the hill and ended the conversation on the other side of the hill because it took that long for us to get the job done but the senator was responsible for the first public money coming into this venture that eventually grew into the building you were all sitting in now. fo
.m. eastern here on cing span 3. c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your it's provider -- by your television provider. >> host: and this week on "the communicators," gordon smith who is president and ceo of the national association of broadcasters, our guest reporter is paul kirby of telecommunications report. senator smith, you started at nab nearly four years ago. how have the issues changed in those four years? >> guest: well, it seems like the issues just keep on coming, and they tend to be very major issues affecting both radio and television. but clearly on the radio side, the whole issue of performance rights, performance tax, whatever you want to tribe it as, is an ongoing challenge. hopefully, the day will arrive when both the digital and the terrestrial platform can come up with a model that actually grows music and works for both. but right now one has an unsustainable business model, and the other one works for radio, but on the other hand, we need it to work for the performers too. but if you provide a rate t
boy. but anyway, this was actually -- you know, mika, you were probably too young, but america stopped, actually. >> absolutely. >> america stopped and it was -- there was something shocking about a man playing a woman in tennis. >> a man getting his butt kicked. >> well because -- >> yeah. >> joe -- >> paid off. by the way -- >> time to move on -- >> we should have seen this. >> the last gasp of the republican party, right? >> should have seen this a mile away. >> the republican party? >> they don't like women, right? >> it was rigs. >> the only guy -- the only way they could beat a man was if he threw the match, right? >> joe, you're missing a wild -- >> i'm hearing it, but, howard, proves once and for all, the hate mail on twitter today is a marxist because everything, absolutely everything, goes back to politics for marxists. all right. there we go. >> joe calls howard marksesist on -- >> don't -- marxist, everything goes back to politics. >> i don't know no. >> i'm not talking about your ideology but the tennis match and you bring it back to republicans. >> miley cyrus. >> come on
intervention. it believes the rebels will not support america's interest if they were to come to power now. this came out to a letter that general dempsey sent. he said the military is clearly taking out the syrian air force and shifting the balance. michigan republican congressman justin amash held a town hall meeting recently in michigan. he touched on topics like health care and government surveillance. he offered an amendment that would bar the and as a from collecting phone and data records from citizens who are not subject of investigation. the amendment was opposed by speaker john boehner and the white house and ultimately defeated. his town hall back in michigan lasted about one hour and 15 minutes. [applause] >> hello, everyone. ben, he is my chief of staff. he does not just work for me. he is primarily in our grand rapids office, and you can find that on my website, and we have a satellite office in battle creek, so if there is something you would like to schedule, you can contact our grand rapids office, and we will make sure we will have someone to meet with you as well. jordan
new plans to overhaul america's mortgage system today. he's going to propose shutting down government-backed lenders fannie mae and freddie mac, plus, he wants to boost the number of 30-year mortgages in this market hoping it will make loans more accessible to more people so they can fulfill the american dream. carl cameron has more from washington. so a lot of proposals, carl. we're not sure exactly what will become of them, but what is the president proposing today in. >> reporter: well, he wants to strengthen the housing market by making 30-year mortgages more available, and one of the ways would be to do away with fannie mae and freddie mac and institute more capital into mortgage lending. shaun donovan is the president's hud secretary, the secretary of housing and urban development. he's how he put it this morning. >> we also have to make sure we never go back to a system that takes trillions of dollars in housing wealth away from families that can crash the spire world economy. so -- the entire world economy. so a big focus is how do we build a safe, stable housing finance syste
at the time and what it was like to be america's first lady and not just the wife of an american mr. an american minister, but to be a wife and a daughter. >> the thing that i always think about with abigail is the relationship, the partnership. without abigail, there is no john. without john, there is no abigail.>> john is important to history. >> yes. with the support she provided to him in europe, in the presidency, in the vice presidency, she was so trustworthy that she could to -- take care of things. so he could go off and be this great public person, which was exactly what she wanted.>> to our guests, our thanks for helping us understand more about the life and legacy of america's second first lady abigail adams. thank you for your time. >> thank you. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> wednesday night, we continue our encore of the first season ladies," with dolly madison. , september 9, a look at the life of edith roosevelt. our website has a special section on the first ladies, including "welco
of the march on washington. during his remarks he called on america kind of to in his words he said to take on the great unfinished business of the march and he was talking about addressing income disparity, that was one of his big i think themes of the speech. what do you think the big takeaways were of his remarks? a lot of people were waiting to hear what we to say. >> largely will you view this through the prism of your own life and experience. democrats are going to view it differently than republicans, white americans view it differently than african-americans. common things i talked to at the march is they found it less personal and more political than they anticipated. the president only made a brief reference talking about the advancement of african-americans in politics and talked about state government, city government, congress, he said yes, even the white house now. the back half of the speech was about income and equality, education and equality. the president making his case that the country must do more, he needs help from outside washington. that was a key point. change doe
like "spying," "snooping." does anybody think general alexander wants to snoop on america? i think that demeans the whole political dialogue and that's why i wish the president would be more outgoing and defend the n.s.a. a lot more than he did. this has really bane sland or the thousand of good men and women who every day dedicate their thrives our country and particularly general alexander, who is as patriotic as anyone i have ever met in government or anywhere. and there is too much loose talk here. again, every time i hear snooping and spying, it just drives me crazy. dutch and i know what these men and women are doing and they're absolutely dedicated patriots. >> i just want to point out, peter and chairman roarnlings, we have a very bipartisan committee in the intelligence committee. we zfar left. we have far right. but we work together as a team because the stakes are too high. and that's a very important issue. peter, i thank you for being on with us today and i agree a lot of your points. >> schieffer: thanks to both of you. i'll be back in just a second. chronic plaque ps
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're on the tail end america's longest war and that changes people's appetite about what can be done surgical strike they used to call it. sound appealing but we've discovered it doesn't exist. the question is worded makes such a difference in the answer. we've seen over the past week has been an unprecedented the part campaign on of the obama administration. it's not like they said, we're going to bomb. building up and building up with the state department at the front of this reallyng system but trying to send a signal about legitimacy, justification, about they think they have support from the arab league, about the danger -- i want to make a point that peter made about iran, although it's true we don't want win sinceran to they've been supporting the syrian regime, iran is not the use ofth chemical weapons because they had chemical weapons used against them. quiet on this issue. gwen: let's talk about congress for a minute. boehner, the house speaker, wrote a letter to the president being there should meaningful consultation. everybody is interpreting what that means? war powersean resolu
out, the united states of america. our mandate is to report the truth, not what the pio tells us is the truth. even what the cio thinks is the truth. the truth as we can find it. whether it is the time of an easter egg hunt or a national policy. it's america, the land of the free, the land of the free press. and the people that we serve, the people that we are a conduit for, the public of the united states of america has a right to this information. thank you. >> thank you. tony? [laughter] >> it's funny, whenever we have these constitutions, and is they actually happen a lot, you know, i think we look at them in one of two ways. one we just heard, right, is that the public affairs officers are pretty much, you know, obstacles and ill-informed boobs, and reporters are universeally good and have the interest of the public at heart. or it's the opposite, right? is that, you know, reporters are evil scoundrels looking to embarrass public officials and make mockery of the policy making process, and the only thing standing between this evil horde and the print are public affairs offic
in america." the pendulum is swinging in the republican party now. as the party moves hard right, will they really try another establishment time like romney or dole or mccain or christie or jeb bush? or will the party go for one of its tea party heroes like rand paul? here with me now is the author of the great book "collision 2016." dan, let's talk about what you call the subterranean campaign of 2012 and what it offers us in the future. >> we think of the campaign as the campaign we all cover all the time. everything we talk about, every utterance, every gaffe, every debate, every movement. and that's part of politics and in many ways the interesting and enjoyable part of politics, but it's not necessarily the decisive part of politics. there are important and powerful underlying forces that effect every campaign. in 2012, one was the economy. would it be just good enough to allow president obama to win re-election or bad enough to deny re-election. another was voter anger. which direction would it go? a third was the deep red/blue divide and how that shaped attitudes beyond w
when many of us deployed to central america on humanitarian missions -- all of the skill sets paid us benefits in the 90s and 2000. how do we want to have that dynamic training that will keep people in the guard? we are really pushing this hard right now. we have to have the opportunity to fill vacancies. whether it is a critical chart or a chart fall for two or three years. some of you remember the keep up program, where folks can get away from an employer. the family situation is right. they can go close to an active duty bill, especially to the joint world. to focushat we ought on. it starts with getting the active component, the reserve component, structured right for the future. -- he is heading to the marine forces commander reserve. commanding general of our larger organization. first marine general to command nato forces, general mills. >> as a new one on the panel i will say that i came to work with the reserve component with the greatest respect the cousin twice on the battlefield both in iraq and at -- in iraq and afghanistan. one of the biggest challenges is maintaining th
in the pool of daca applicants. those from central america, asia and europe on the other hand are underrepresented in the pool of applicants so far and for these three groups this underrepresentation is also statistically significant. so just a reminder here i'm going through sort of the top line findings and this discussion hopefully will unpack some of the receipts why. okay. so we can move beyond national origins and this is where i do apologize because this should have been removed because this is all about stroking academic ego but this is just a multivariant regression analysis. this is a way to take all of the data, analyze the data while controlling for other factors. now, underrepresentation is one thing and new or bolstered outreach to those particular national origin groups can correct that underrepresentation but are all groups experiencing daca sort of equally? well another way we can address that question it look at denials. so when we think about approvals versus denials, we can ask ourselves, are any particular groups disproportionately being denied? so this ma
, the islamists in syria will be emboldened, they will say this is america, turned you down again and the mother of arab states will see it as another sign of weakness and iran will be emboldened. >> let's talk about the arab league. those arab nations are not exactly taking a bold stand themselves right now. they've spoken out against the alleged chemical attack in syria, spoken out against bashar al assad but they're not ready to support any kind of military action here. what do they really want? >> the saudis and jordanians and others, their intent is to get rid of this regime. they want to see assad out and they want a tactical defeat of iran and hezbollah. they're not going to participate openly like some did like fattah in libya. one of the reasons we have this tragedy in syria is the regional powers are unable to provide the leadership, europeans on their own cannot provide leadership and because of the dithering of the obama regime, there is no leadership. everybody is waiting for an american leadership, they cannot do it on their own. >> president obama has a tough choice on syria. the
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